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Quarter Community Website

Friendship Group

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Quarter in Lanarkshire

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Quarter Friendship Club’s Visit to Luss

The 2006 outing was to Luss on the shores of Loch Lomond. The bus left Quarter Parish Church at about 11.00 a.m. and arrived at the Church of MacKessog in Luss approximately 1½ hours later. We were met at the door by Lorraine Sharpe, who gave an interesting talk on the Church history, Stained glass windows and the hatchments housed within the Church. Our group then meandered over to the Pilgrimage Centre where we had lunch, provided by the Ladies of the Church, followed by a film show of the work carried out by the Church Congregation and of the projects across the river.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 






The Pilgrimage Centre
The Loch Lomond Pilgrimage Centre is situated in the Church grounds, opposite the Church of MacKessog. The Centre was officially opened on the 16th September 2004 and is now the hub of the small community. The craft units within the centre are open to anyone who would like to try their hand at candle making, pottery or ceramic painting. They have four wheels in the pottery and can run short courses for those who are interested. They have a Film Club for children, Mums and Dads and have facilities for corporate meetings, small conferences and children’s parties.

St. Kessog
The Church is known as the Church of MacKessog, from Saint Kessog who came to Luss in 510 AD, approximately half a century before St Columba landed on Iona. He was a member of the Royal Family of Munster in Southern Ireland and was very pious and holy even as a young child. He came to Luss and settled on the island of Inchtavannach, which lies opposite the little hamlet of Bandry 1½ miles south of Luss. He set up a monastery on the island, unfortunately nothing remains of St. Kessog’s monastery, but some old ruins, indicating that there was probably a later building on the same site.
St. Kessog was killed at Bandry on 10th March 520 AD. The site was marked by a cairn to which stones were added by pilgrims. The cairn was removed in the 18th Century to allow for road improvements.

Some previous Visits

In 2008 there was a trip to Tam O' Shanter

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Our Christmas Lunch was held on Friday 7th Dec 2012 at the Avonbridge Hotel

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